Women put this in their vaginas to protect themselves from rapists. For the perpetrator it’s the ultimate torture.

Sexual assault is a horrible crime that sadly thousands of women are victims of every day. The physical aspect is harsh enough, yet the mental aspect can be terribly traumatic.

South Africa is said to have the highest rate of sexual assault in the world. An average of 52,000 assaults end up getting reported annually. Of course that number is likely far greater as there are so many that go unreported.

Working with rape victims in South Africa is something that Sonette Ehlers knows a lot about. It has made her realize just how horribly bad this problem really is, and that serious measures really need to be implemented.

Well this indeed is a serious measure. It’s a condom for women, “femidom”, that Ehlers has come up with. This is far from any normal condom though. She actually calls her invention “Rape Axe” and the name indeed fits.

Inside, the condom is filled with sharp plastic hooks. These will penetrate into the penis, as soon as it goes into the vagina.

While the rapist will get inside, they won’t get far. It’s designed to stop rapists so they do not further instigate their sick crime. The rapist immediately will be yelling in pain, suffering horribly for his act. This provides the opportunity for the women to escape.

It will take surgery to remove the hooks, so the rapist can be popped in the hospital by police.

The Rape Axe is also protection from pregnancy and STDs. A woman can wear it for up to 24 hours at a time. As easy to insert as a tampon, and the wearer runs no risk of injury as tests have shown.

Critics of the Rape Axe believe rapists would be more aggressive and more harm could be inflicted on the victim. It’s also only a protector from vaginal rape, and is only effective after initial penetration has already occurred.

Still, you can see how effective the Rape Axe really is. It can serve as a deterrent if would be rapists know that more and more women might be wearing them.

It’s still being developed and further investment is needed. Definitely not for everyone, but in areas of high risk it is a painful shield to stop an attack from going any further.